Archive for the ‘Self-Growth’ Category

Be The Person Your Dog Thinks You Are

Monday, September 28th, 2015

The key driver in your business is the boss.

Too many employees think of the boss as a problem—a nuisance looking over your shoulder, or a target for grumbling complaints. If that describes your workplace, it’s time to rethink that.

Think of your business like a website. Have you ever been on a site that’s gorgeous and flashy, but once you try to actually use it, everything is confusing and broken? That’s just what you have when your business fails to support the drivers that make the visible things actually happen.

Your boss needs your support. Of course he isn’t perfect. Of course he is overly demanding. Of course he can be downright annoying and change his mind and sometimes even be a bit under appreciative. He breathes! People aren’t perfect.

When you condemn your boss and complain about him to others, YOU are the problem. We’ve already established your boss breaths and isn’t perfect. You aren’t there to point that out. You are there to support him and your team. Go back and look at the job posting from when you took the job. Chances are it didn’t say anything about complaining about your boss and pointing out what is wrong with your boss to others. In fact, doing that behavior is as mean spirited of a behavior as you can have.

So forgive yourself everything from the past if you’ve done that. But now is the time to be the loving, kind, joyful person your dog thinks you are. Now is the time to bring your higher self to work to join the team instead of complaining about the team.

I promise you will start to love your job even more as soon as you take it on in this way—it’s transformative.

How do you get to Carnegie Hall?

Sunday, February 8th, 2015

You know the line…How do you get to Carnegie Hall? “Practice, Practice, Practice!”

Well, how do you get successful in your career?

Just three things: Hit your numbers. Hit your deadlines. And live the values of the organization.

Yes, there are a million things to do and you don’t have enough time. BUT the question is, how will you hit your numbers and deadlines regardless of those things, regardless of the lack of time?

True enough, the economy isn’t supportive and the competition is brutal, so there are many reasons you can’t hit your numbers. But what if you decided to anyway?
What would you have to change to make that happen?

A person of value is someone who consistently does the things others can’t or won’t do. They get results regardless of circumstances. They focus on the basics, and they get the job done, in part because it doesn’t occur to them that failure is an option.

It’s simply not on the list of possibilities.

Think about it this way—What if the person who handles payroll approached the job with an attitude of, “I’ll see if I can figure out how to get it done”?

That’s right. You got it now, didn’t you. What most people miss is that results are a non-negotiable in ALL jobs—not just in payroll.

Hit your numbers. Hit deadlines. Live values. That’s the way forward.

Ethics over the little things

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

I remember it like it was yesterday. My baby brother was about three when he came home with a pack of gum in his hands from the grocery story.

It wasn’t paid for. And by my parents’ reaction, you would have thought the bank was robbed.

Everything stopped, and three kids were loaded back up in the car for a long ride to return the gum and apologize to the store owner.

Now, at three years old, he wasn’t exactly destined for a life of crime. But he was setting up one of the most memorable dinner table lessons. My father said, “If you steal, you may as well steal millions, because the impact is the same—you’ve ruined your reputation.”

You don’t forget a moment like that.

It would have been easy to ignore it—it was no big deal. But it was a HUGE deal.

As for my brother, don’t worry—he’s a standout as an example of an ethical husband and father.

We are all faced every day with our humanity and the temptation to tell the “little white lie.” We are all tempted.
In fact, in the classic book The Day America Told the Truth, author James Patterson’s research showed that 97 percent of people lie regularly.

The question is, do you want that to be your legacy—or do you want it to be one of greatness?

Practice Isn’t Enough

Monday, October 6th, 2014

You’ve probably heard the old joke about the man stopping a cabbie in New York to ask for directions. “Excuse me, can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?”

“Sure,” said the cabbie. “Practice, practice, practice!”

Nice gag, but practice by itself in any field will not guarantee success. Practicing the right things in the right way will. Winners find the best of the best as their mentors and coaches and are relentless in applying and practicing the guidance they receive. The greatest artists, scientists, and athletes hook up with teachers that know more about the craft than anyone else, then they follow their advice.

The same thing applies to business. Don’t think that doing something over and over is enough to achieve mastery. Find people who’ve been there before who can tell you where to focus your attention and how to practice your skills. That’s the ticket to success that really works.

If You Were The CEO

Monday, June 16th, 2014

Let’s imagine for a second that your fairy godmother comes along, and “poof” you’re now the CEO of your organization AND you are featured as running the #1 organization in your industry, AND you’re doing it without breaking a sweat.

Let me ask you: Would you be operating on the same habits, decision-making skills, and thinking as you have now? Of course not.

Well, what if today, you made every decision, managed your calendar, and thought and performed AS IF you were at that level? Would that change your performance on the duties you currently are in charge of? Of course you would!

AND would it make you infinitely more promotable and allow you to get more done with less time and effort—and focus on what really matters? There’s no question!

Imagine your success if you grew by 10 to 25 percent every quarter in your ability to do your job and the job of the person you report into. Think of how much more effective and promotable you would be. The way to get there is to let go of the “story” about why you’re too busy to sharpen your skill-set. Start sharpening it every day without exception.