Archive for the ‘TGIM Workplace’ Category

Building renewal into the day

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

Business author Tony Schwartz has spent fifteen years looking at the American workplace, so he knows that engagement is always a struggle. But the latest numbers even took him by surprise.

70% of workers say they lack time for creative or strategic thinking. Two-thirds say they can’t focus on more than one thing at a time. And nearly as many say they never have time for the things they enjoy most in their work. The urgent, he said, overwhelms the important on a daily basis.

The solution is to take control of your boundaries. There are no finish lines any more in American business. We are going all the time. But research shows that being relentlessly “on” diminishes productivity, creativity, and focus.

Turn off your devices and don’t reply to emails in the evening or on most weekends. Encourage others to do the same so it becomes the norm at your company.

If you have control over your break schedule, short breaks every 90 minutes DRAMATICALLY increase focus and productivity, much more than a single long lunch break.

Do what you can to work smarter, not harder, and the results will speak for themselves.

Share Your Limits

Monday, October 10th, 2016

There’s always more work to be done….am I right? But one of the most productive things anyone can do is set definite limits on the work you bring home. Sometimes it’s unavoidable, and that’s fine. But when it becomes a norm to work through the evening, you are sapping your energy and reducing your productivity. And nobody wins that game.

Want some help keeping those limits in place? Share them with those around you.

If you’ve decided not to work after 7 pm, tell your wife or husband and the kids. They’ll hold you to it, believe me! And both your work life AND your home life, will be better for it.

How’s your relationship with your boss?

Sunday, March 15th, 2015

A recent study by Dale Carnegie Training found that fewer than 30 percent of employees are fully engaged at work. But the survey went further, asking those engaged employees what accounts for their engagement. The number one factor? Their relationship with their immediate supervisor.

This isn’t the first time personal relationships have been found to be important for engagement. Gallup research has found the same result for years.

That doesn’t mean managers and direct reports have to go on long walks together or bond over a candlelight dinner. They just have to communicate clearly and authentically, connect, and bring their whole hearts and minds to their workplace relationships.

Your relationship with your boss is one of your most important relationships. Fortunately a great deal is in your control. Keep her fully informed on the status of things, always tell the truth, go above and beyond, and always support her projects.

Most of all, speak positively about your boss. Of course she has flaws…and so do you. Ask for what you need and don’t beat her up for what she isn’t. Bring your higher self to the relationship.

Nurture your relationship with your boss and build trust by hitting your numbers and your deadlines and you will build a relationship that will serve you well all through your career.

Building renewal into the day

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

Business author Tony Schwartz has spent fifteen years looking at the American workplace, so he knows that engagement is always a struggle. But the latest numbers even took him by surprise.

70% of workers say they lack time for creative or strategic thinking. Two-thirds say they can’t focus on more than one thing at a time. And nearly as many say they never have time for the things they enjoy most in their work. The urgent, he said, overwhelms the important on a daily basis.

The solution is to take control of your boundaries. There are no finish lines any more in American business. We are going all the time. But research shows that being relentlessly “on” diminishes productivity, creativity, and focus.

Turn off your devices and don’t reply to emails in the evening or on most weekends. Encourage others to do the same so it becomes the norm at your company.

If you have control over your break schedule, short breaks every 90 minutes DRAMATICALLY increase focus and productivity, much more than a single long lunch break.

Do what you can to work smarter, not harder, and the results will speak for themselves.

Button Down for Opportunity

Sunday, December 21st, 2014

Mark Twain said it best: “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence in society.”

Well, that’s probably stretching it. You probably don’t go to work naked. But even so, there may be times when your workplace attire isn’t putting your best foot forward.

Executives are buzzing about inappropriate dress making some of their workers less promotable. It’s fast becoming one of the most talked about problems in companies. You don’t want to end up on that list.

Standards vary by profession, but here are some basic recommendations for what’s appropriate if you’re in a professional office.

Consider these things:

Ladies: Dressing for the nightclub (or the fitness club, for that matter) is not the same as dressing for work. At work, it’s conservative – no perfume, skirts right above the knee, clothes that are not too tight or pants dragging on the floor. And the biggest issue of all—if you want to be taken seriously, keep “the girls” under cover! Research shows that if you have “that line” showing even once, it tends to reduce the likelihood of advancement. Don’t make that career-limiting move.

I’m not saying you have to dress like Little Orphan Annie. There is a middle ground. It’s about looking like you could meet with a top prospect at the drop of a hat and be a respectable representative of the company.

Guys: You have it a little easier. Shirts in white or blue are best—no Easter egg colors or flashy ties. Grey, navy, or black jackets and pants complete a good professional look where you can’t go wrong. The biggest complaints with guys include not being pressed or not having hair your clean and well cut and face shaved. And by the way, Bigfoot – don’t forget to shave your neck.

Best tip of all: Watch to see what your manager wears, and start wearing that NOW if you want to ever want to be considered for a promotion. If in doubt, dress more conservatively and more professionally. A navy and black jacket will turn almost anything into a professional look. Invest in one of those.

You might say it’s not fair to be passed over if your performance is good. Let me just say it happens every day anyway because there’s an enormous subjective component to hiring and advancement, and how you present yourself and how you represent the company really does matter.

So get those neat, well-dressed ducks in a row to remove one more obstacle in your path to success!