Posts Tagged ‘Culture Transformation’

If you had half the resources and a quarter of the time…

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

Ask yourself this: If you had half the resources and a quarter of the time to do your job, how would you do it differently?

I know what you’re thinking: “No way. It can’t be done! I’m barely making it as it is!” But humor me for a minute. Imagine that you have absolutely no choice but to do everything you currently do with half the resources and a quarter of the time. No choice at all.

Now…what would you do?

The first shift would be in attitude. It would HAVE to be. Once the shift in attitude is made, you are willing to do whatever it takes. Resentment doesn’t build up and defeat your energy. Suddenly the impossible becomes possible.

The second shift would be in organization. You would be forced to get very organized, very quickly, with daily, weekly, and monthly checklists.

Now imagine what would happen to your productivity if you adopted this attitude now, today, even with all the time and resources you have. Nothing would ever stand in your way again.

The Not-So-Innocent Bystander

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

Back in college, my closest friends and I would joke around continuously. We’d laugh and we’d laugh. But sometimes, the joking would go just a little bit too far. We’d joke about someone in a way we wouldn’t do if they were there with us.

In those moments, I’d sit back and tell myself that if I weren’t the one overstepping the invisible boundary, well then, I was innocent. I was wrong about that.

You see, I could have stepped in. I could have voiced my opinion with saying “this is not okay!”

But I didn’t.

How often do you passively watch things occur that are inconsistent with your standard of ethics? Imagine just how easy it would be to step in.

Focus on orchestrating only ‘good things around you. Diligently intervene when you see otherwise.

Standing passively by is not the same as standing innocently by.

Take responsibility

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Business management guru Patrick Lencioni knows something about dysfunctional behavior. In his classic book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni lays out the five behaviors that can bring any team to its knees.

The first is an absence of trust, which is fueled by a lack of accountability. The second is fear of conflict. Nobody confronts missed deadlines and outcomes because they don’t want conflict, and everything goes down in flames.

Third is a lack of commitment, and fourth is inattention to results.

But the fifth dysfunction is one of the worst—the avoidance of accountability. This includes ducking the responsibility to call peers on dysfunctional behavior AND refusing to hold yourself accountable for outcomes.

In a very real way, a lack of accountability leads to all four of the other Lencioni dysfunctions. It causes people to mistrust each other, to avoid conflict by “going along to get along,” to withhold commitment, and to let results slide.

It’s every person’s job to make sure that one person doesn’t blow the ship up for the rest. Realize that you are responsible for everything that goes on around you—don’t watch someone failing, then fail to step up to direct, assist, and speak up. And know your own critical drivers, and hold yourself 100 percent responsible to them no matter what.

Make it a great day

Monday, March 31st, 2014

For most of my life I’ve heard people tell me to, “Have a great day!” It always seemed like a nice enough thing to say—until the first time I heard someone change it just slightly.

It blew me out of the water.

It was years ago, I was picking something up from the pharmacy, and the girl handed me my receipt and said, “Thank you—make it a great day!”

Such a small change, but what a difference! “Have a great day” is a basically wish, a hope that your day will be great. But if you tell me to make it a great day, it underlines the fact that the greatness of my day is in my control.

It’s true! So much of our experience of life is determined by the way we react to things as they happen. Yes, the rain complicates your drive to work. It also brings life to every living thing. Focus on one and a rainy day is a drag. Focus on the other and it’s a miracle and a relief.

Once in a while my husband and I underline this in our own way. We wake up and say, “I wonder what super fantastic thing is going to happen to us today?”

However you do it, take control of the greatness of your day, and help others do the same!

The Magic 3

Monday, September 12th, 2011

* Transcription

Thank God it’s Monday!™ What separates successful teams from the mediocre? From their book The Orange Revolution, Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton conducted a 350,000 person study that revealed the answers.

Reason #1: The drive to be great. Successful companies consistently commit to top performance.

Reason #2: Honesty. Poor teams lack honesty. Open debate and comfort are necessary for maximum success.

Reason #3: Lack of Selfishness. Company success is a product of collective productivity. Companies thrive when each individual cares about every other individual’s success.

So where does your organization fall? Are you acting as a successful organization, or are you slipping through the cracks into these poor habits that pull you back from what’s possible for you. Drive, honesty, and lack of selfishness make the difference.

Have a great Monday!

Roxanne

Roxanne Emmerich’s Thank God It’s Monday! How to Create a Workplace You and Your Customers Love climbed to #1 on Amazon’s bestseller list and made the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller lists—all in the first week of its release. Roxanne is renowned for her ability to transform “ho-hum” workplaces into dynamic, results-oriented, “bring-it-on” cultures. If you are not currently receiving the Thank God It’s Monday e-zine and weekly audios, subscribe today at www.ThankGoditsMonday.com.

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