Posts Tagged ‘Employee Engagement’

Internal customer service

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

When most people picture a customer, they naturally think of the person who buys a company’s products and services. Making that person’s life better and easier is a great way to think of customer service.

But what about internal customer service—the way employees interact with and support others in the company? The best companies make sure their internal customer service is on par with their external customer service.

Suppose you work in IT and somebody’s computer is down. Now they can’t deliver great external service. You might make it your own goal that “No one will be down more than one hour.” Internal service supports external service.

Internal customer service also sets the tone for employee engagement. Each phone call from a colleague should be answered with the same courteous, “How may I help you?” language and tone that external customers receive.

This also has a huge impact on employee engagement. We are the face of the company to each other. If we see a cold and uncaring face when we interact with other employees, we will each naturally come to see the company itself as cold and uncaring. It’s hard to stay engaged in your work when you see your company in that unflattering light.

Engagement is tied directly to productivity, of course, so It’s not just a matter of being “nice.” Upping your internal customer service game can make the difference between a company that founders on the rocks and smooth sailing.

If you had half the resources and a quarter of the time…

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

Ask yourself this: If you had half the resources and a quarter of the time to do your job, how would you do it differently?

I know what you’re thinking: “No way. It can’t be done! I’m barely making it as it is!” But humor me for a minute. Imagine that you have absolutely no choice but to do everything you currently do with half the resources and a quarter of the time. No choice at all.

Now…what would you do?

The first shift would be in attitude. It would HAVE to be. Once the shift in attitude is made, you are willing to do whatever it takes. Resentment doesn’t build up and defeat your energy. Suddenly the impossible becomes possible.

The second shift would be in organization. You would be forced to get very organized, very quickly, with daily, weekly, and monthly checklists.

Now imagine what would happen to your productivity if you adopted this attitude now, today, even with all the time and resources you have. Nothing would ever stand in your way again.

Progress as Promised!

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Researchers are learning more all the time about the importance of feeling progress toward our workplace goals. It’s called the Progress Principle, and it’s fast becoming a big part of the conversation about employee engagement. In fact, the Harvard Business Reviews research shows it is the most important motivator.

Multiple studies have shown that a feeling of progress in our work is at or near the top in motivation—way ahead of traditional incentives like raises and bonuses.

But not everyone is paying attention. In a survey that asked managers to rank five employee motivators, the feeling of progress came in dead last.

Let your competition pour money into more expensive motivators. A feeling of progress costs little or nothing. Break large projects into smaller benchmarks, and celebrate each step as it’s achieved. It’s as simple as that.

It’s yet another opportunity for those who are paying attention to pull ahead of the pack.

Collaborate for Greatness

Monday, December 1st, 2014

There’s a common idea that great breakthroughs and accomplishments come from solitary geniuses and lone heroes.

Much more often, great things come to pass as a result of a consistent commitment to collaboration. Jump on board, and like the world itself, you can take advantage of the minds around you.

Network, mastermind, and brainstorm with driven people around you. Share your struggles, and let others help you navigate your way through the hurdles.

Commit yourself to maintaining an open mind. Sometimes the right answer may not sound right to you simply because you did not come up with it for yourself. But the power that you can harness by gathering these many minds is simply an opportunity you cannot pass up.

And remember, people love to help others who take the help and implement. That is the greatest complement to someone who reaches out to help.

Don’t Wear Exhaustion Like a Badge of Honor

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

You might think the boss will be mighty impressed to see you dragging your tired feet around the office. Obviously you’ve been working hard, right?

Think again.

The only signal you’re sending is that you are out of control of your physical and emotional health.

Make a pledge to become a well-oiled machine, NOT an overheated engine. Only the well-oiled machine is of any use in the long run. Get rest, eat right, and exercise.

If you see a frazzled face in the mirror, it’s not a badge of honor—it’s a failure to maximize your abilities by taking proper care of yourself and not focusing on affective and efficient work.

This is easier said than done. We’re conditioned to brag about our exhaustion. But once you make the change and see your productivity and quality of life go through the roof, you’ll never go back to that tired old illusion again.