Posts Tagged ‘Workplace productivity’

Progress as Promised!

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

Researchers are learning more all the time about the importance of feeling progress toward our workplace goals. It’s called the Progress Principle, and it’s fast becoming a big part of the conversation about employee engagement. In fact, the Harvard Business Reviews research shows it is the most important motivator.

Multiple studies have shown that a feeling of progress in our work is at or near the top in motivation—way ahead of traditional incentives like raises and bonuses.

But not everyone is paying attention. In a survey that asked managers to rank five employee motivators, the feeling of progress came in dead last.

Let your competition pour money into more expensive motivators. A feeling of progress costs little or nothing. Break large projects into smaller benchmarks, and celebrate each step as it’s achieved. It’s as simple as that.

It’s yet another opportunity for those who are paying attention to pull ahead of the pack.

Collaborate for Greatness

Monday, December 1st, 2014

There’s a common idea that great breakthroughs and accomplishments come from solitary geniuses and lone heroes.

Much more often, great things come to pass as a result of a consistent commitment to collaboration. Jump on board, and like the world itself, you can take advantage of the minds around you.

Network, mastermind, and brainstorm with driven people around you. Share your struggles, and let others help you navigate your way through the hurdles.

Commit yourself to maintaining an open mind. Sometimes the right answer may not sound right to you simply because you did not come up with it for yourself. But the power that you can harness by gathering these many minds is simply an opportunity you cannot pass up.

And remember, people love to help others who take the help and implement. That is the greatest complement to someone who reaches out to help.

Who You Are When No One is Looking?

Monday, November 10th, 2014

Imagine that your boss goes away for a few days. You’ve been working soooo hard, and now, finally, you’re free from the pressure of your employers.

You still come into work, of course. You still sit at the same desk. You still drink the same coffee and eat at the same time. But how have you changed?

Do you still bring the same energy, seize the same opportunities, work just as hard as before? Or do you find ways to cut corners and slack off because, you know, who’s gonna know?

Only you can truthfully answer these questions.

At the end of each day, you can convince yourself that you worked soooo hard, can convince yourself that you’ve contributed soooo much. And maybe you have. Only you know.

And the best indicator of who you are for real is who you are when no one is looking. Character is revealed when no one is watching.

Don’t Wear Exhaustion Like a Badge of Honor

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

You might think the boss will be mighty impressed to see you dragging your tired feet around the office. Obviously you’ve been working hard, right?

Think again.

The only signal you’re sending is that you are out of control of your physical and emotional health.

Make a pledge to become a well-oiled machine, NOT an overheated engine. Only the well-oiled machine is of any use in the long run. Get rest, eat right, and exercise.

If you see a frazzled face in the mirror, it’s not a badge of honor—it’s a failure to maximize your abilities by taking proper care of yourself and not focusing on affective and efficient work.

This is easier said than done. We’re conditioned to brag about our exhaustion. But once you make the change and see your productivity and quality of life go through the roof, you’ll never go back to that tired old illusion again.

Practice Isn’t Enough

Monday, October 6th, 2014

You’ve probably heard the old joke about the man stopping a cabbie in New York to ask for directions. “Excuse me, can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?”

“Sure,” said the cabbie. “Practice, practice, practice!”

Nice gag, but practice by itself in any field will not guarantee success. Practicing the right things in the right way will. Winners find the best of the best as their mentors and coaches and are relentless in applying and practicing the guidance they receive. The greatest artists, scientists, and athletes hook up with teachers that know more about the craft than anyone else, then they follow their advice.

The same thing applies to business. Don’t think that doing something over and over is enough to achieve mastery. Find people who’ve been there before who can tell you where to focus your attention and how to practice your skills. That’s the ticket to success that really works.