Archive for the ‘Dysfunctional Workplace’ Category

Stop saying “But you said”

Monday, September 12th, 2022

What one person says is often not what another person hears. Why is that? It’s because communication is challenging, and the communication from one person’s lips to somebody else’s brain rarely stays intact. One person can say one thing, and the other person listening can genuinely hear something else.

If you have six people all listening to the same person speaking, you’ll often have two or three different versions of what was heard. It’s important to become the person who says “what I heard was” instead of “what you said was.”

(more…)

Rise Above Limiting Beliefs

Monday, February 21st, 2022

People never exceed their belief systems.

If you don’t believe you can get premium pricing over what you charge in your company, you’re not going to get premium pricing.

It’s not because somebody else can’t, it just means you’re never going to exceed your belief systems.

You’re never going to exceed your belief systems in terms of your capacity to be successful at work. If you believe you’re only capable of so much, you will fulfill your promise to yourself, sadly.

(more…)

Our disowned parts…

Monday, February 14th, 2022
 

What part of you are you projecting on others?

Carl Jung taught us that what we love about other people we love about ourselves. What we dislike about others, speaks highly of the work we need to do on ourselves. Okay, I know you didn’t want to hear that. And yeah, I know you don’t believe it. And yet, psychologist after psychologist has proven that we project our disowned parts of ourselves onto others.

Look around and decide what you don’t like in other people that you work with.

If you had a problem getting along with your boss, it might not have anything to do with your boss, and you might not have had a good relationship with your previous boss and perhaps the boss before that.

If that’s the case, I’ll bet they all look the same. Why? Because these kinds of things are archetypal. In other words, we repeat the same patterns we had before; patterns so foundational to ourselves that we keep seeing them. So, as you listen to people complain about others in your workplace, notice that oftentimes, what people are really complaining about is their disowned parts of themselves.

Own the parts of you that are the ugly

So instead, ask people for what you want directly. Own the parts of you that are the ugly little part of you; that evil twin that comes along to work every day.

As you own that and look at that, it gives you the ability to say, Hmm, okay, I could be doing some work on myself. I’m going to stop making it about others and instead, step into it and realize that it’s my job to decide to love everybody with whom I work.

We still have our lines in the sand asking for what we need, but we can do it with kindness and gentleness, and just create a better awareness as opposed to being upset by it, and then we can stop projecting our disowned parts of ourselves onto others.

I bet we’ll be a whole lot happier being ourselves and being with the people that we’re around.

Creating real value?

Monday, December 6th, 2021

Set an Intention

Ask yourself this question: What action could you take today to demonstrate excellence or real value? It’s a question worth thinking about every day.

I know many people set intentions of how they’re going to go about doing things.

(more…)

Our disowned parts…

Monday, November 22nd, 2021
 

What part of you are you projecting on others?

Carl Jung taught us that what we love about other people we love about ourselves. What we dislike about others, speaks highly of the work we need to do on ourselves. Okay, I know you didn’t want to hear that. And yeah, I know you don’t believe it. And yet, psychologist after psychologist has proven that we project our disowned parts of ourselves onto others.

Look around and decide what you don’t like in other people that you work with.

If you had a problem getting along with your boss, it might not have anything to do with your boss, and you might not have had a good relationship with your previous boss and perhaps the boss before that.

If that’s the case, I’ll bet they all look the same. Why? Because these kinds of things are archetypal. In other words, we repeat the same patterns we had before; patterns so foundational to ourselves that we keep seeing them. So, as you listen to people complain about others in your workplace, notice that oftentimes, what people are really complaining about is their disowned parts of themselves.

Own the parts of you that are the ugly

So instead, ask people for what you want directly. Own the parts of you that are the ugly little part of you; that evil twin that comes along to work every day.

As you own that and look at that, it gives you the ability to say, Hmm, okay, I could be doing some work on myself. I’m going to stop making it about others and instead, step into it and realize that it’s my job to decide to love everybody with whom I work.

We still have our lines in the sand asking for what we need, but we can do it with kindness and gentleness, and just create a better awareness as opposed to being upset by it, and then we can stop projecting our disowned parts of ourselves onto others.

I bet we’ll be a whole lot happier being ourselves and being with the people that we’re around.