Archive for the ‘Stay Focused’ Category

How to Spot a Pot-Stirrer

Friday, September 18th, 2020

Have you ever watched a pot-stirrer at work?

Yeah, they exist everywhere and in almost every organization, and they really can bring down the spirit of everyone around them because pot stirrers make it unsafe to just have great days and lots of sanity and things that work. They say things that sound innocent but aren’t intended to be innocent at all like “do you know Julie just got that project, do you think that’s fair?” or “gosh, I don’t mean anything bad by this, but Jim Bob just got promoted and I sure think he doesn’t have what it takes to make that happen”.

Those kinds of statements create all kinds of craziness within an organization because they’re not direct requests of someone who can make a difference. Ask yourself if you ever stirred the pot and, if you have, forgive yourselves of everything from the past because you can’t change that. But what you can do, alternatively, is decide never to be a pot-stirrer again.

Your workplace needs you to bring the highest level of integrity to what you do. And so, it can’t just sound like it seems innocent, it must really be innocent – and you know the difference.

How to Thrive in the Recession: Lean-in to Your Customers

Sunday, April 19th, 2020

Difficult times require us to get massive about making an impact on our customers. What used to work will not be enough in the future. Now is the time to be calling them and finding out what’s going on with them. Find out what they’re fearful about, find out what their dreams are, find out where they think they might be compromising their dreams, asking them how they might take advantage of this situation to find other revenue streams and different opportunities.

Recessions historically have been the opportunity to pull ahead. And one of the best things that you can do is help your people dream the next possibility. Those who sit and wait to be told what to do and stay in the old actions will be very limited, both for you, within your organization, and also for them. So now is the time to get massive about helping your customers see a new possibility, and get busy helping them accomplish that possibility. By helping other people, that’s how we help ourselves and our own organizations.

Now is a wakeup call for us to get even better at that than we ever were before. So seize the opportunity.

In Crisis, There’s No Time For Nonsense

Sunday, April 12th, 2020

In difficult times, there’s no time for nonsense. Forgive yourselves everything from the past, but right now there is no time for excuses. There is no time for whining and complaining about what doesn’t work. There’s no time for gossip, whether you spread it or are receiving it. In fact, that should be a non-negotiable at all times, because that makes for an unsafe work environment.

Instead, this is the time to bring your highest and best self to work every single day, to also find ways to do things that you never thought that you could. Listen, everything that someone’s a master at, they didn’t use to be a master at it. So why would you be different? If you’re not good at grammar and spelling, use these challenging times to go home at night, read a couple of books, get online, take some testing, learn grammar and spelling, become a master. If you’re not good at marketing copy, go figure that piece out. If you’re not good at sales processes, go decide to be a master of it. Whatever it is that is your profession, step in, get good at it, and allow no-nonsense from yourself or from anyone else in your organization.

These are the times where everyone wants to be a leader, and if you’re waiting for someone else to say, no, we don’t do things like that around here, let me assure you that that nonsense will be the reason that layoffs will happen and that your salaries will be frozen. So step in and be a shepherd of your culture right now.

How do you get to Carnegie Hall?

Sunday, February 8th, 2015

You know the line…How do you get to Carnegie Hall? “Practice, Practice, Practice!”

Well, how do you get successful in your career?

Just three things: Hit your numbers. Hit your deadlines. And live the values of the organization.

Yes, there are a million things to do and you don’t have enough time. BUT the question is, how will you hit your numbers and deadlines regardless of those things, regardless of the lack of time?

True enough, the economy isn’t supportive and the competition is brutal, so there are many reasons you can’t hit your numbers. But what if you decided to anyway?
What would you have to change to make that happen?

A person of value is someone who consistently does the things others can’t or won’t do. They get results regardless of circumstances. They focus on the basics, and they get the job done, in part because it doesn’t occur to them that failure is an option.

It’s simply not on the list of possibilities.

Think about it this way—What if the person who handles payroll approached the job with an attitude of, “I’ll see if I can figure out how to get it done”?

That’s right. You got it now, didn’t you. What most people miss is that results are a non-negotiable in ALL jobs—not just in payroll.

Hit your numbers. Hit deadlines. Live values. That’s the way forward.

Conditions of Satisfaction

Monday, October 7th, 2013

When have you REALLY finished a project? When you KNOW the conditions of the project are completely satisfied. You see…all projects are like a sandwich and the conditions of satisfaction are the bread.

Before you EVEN start the project, get the conditions of satisfaction from your boss—as much detail as you possibly can on when it needs to be done, what the components are what things NEED to be included in the final project for it to be a success—deadline, components, best practices, likely obstacles, the works.

This is the first slice of bread. And it’s your job to get them. Your boss can’t mind read so she doesn’t know what you don’t know. As a receiver of the information, take charge to fully understand before moving ahead.

Next – is the meat. The actual project.

When you think you’re done, STOP! Be sure to put on that last piece of bread. Go to your boss and explain that you THINK you finished, but you want to be sure that every condition of the project was fulfilled.

Only then is the project closed, and it’s time to tee up the next one.